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Waiting For Godot
(Samuel Beckett)

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Waiting for Godot (sometimes subtitled: a tragicomedy in 2 acts) is an absurdist play by Samuel Beckett, written in the late 1940s and first published in 1952. Beckett originally wrote Godot in French, his second language, as En attendant Godot (literally: While Waiting for Godot). An English translation by Beckett himself was published in 1955.
The play is in two acts, and in both of them the tramps Vladimir and Estragon wait in vain by a roadside for Godot, with whom they have an appointment. The audience never learns who Godot is or the nature of the business they expect to transact with him. In each act the cruel Pozzo and his slave Lucky turn up, followed by a boy who gives Vladimir and Estragon the message that Godot will not come today "but surely tomorrow". This intentionally uneventful and repetitious plot symbolizes the tedium and meaninglessness of human life which is a common theme of existentialism. A common interpretation of the mysteriously absent Godot is that he represents God, though Beckett always denied this. As a proper noun, the name "Godot" may derive from any number of French verbs. Beckett himself stated it was derivative of godillot, which is French slang for "boot". The title then might been seen as suggesting the characters of the play are "Waiting for the Boot".
Several unauthorized sequels where Godot actually arrives have been written by other authors, and at least one prequel.
Synopsis
The play is in two acts. The plot concerns Vladimir (also called Didi) and Estragon (also called Gogo), who arrive at a pre-specified roadside location in order to await the arrival of Godot. Vladimir and Estragon appear to be tramps: their clothes are ragged and do not fit, another theory is that Vladimir and Estragon could be refugees or soldiers displaced from a conflict, such as the Second World War, which had just occurred and provided Beckett with much inspiration for this play. They pass the time in conversation, and sometimes in conflict. Estragon complains of his ill-fitting boots, and Vladimir struts about stiff-legged due to a painful bladder condition. They make vague allusions to the nature of their circumstances and to the reasons for meeting Godot, but the audience never learns who Godot is or why he is important. They are soon interrupted by the arrival of Pozzo, a cruel but lyrically gifted man who claims to own the land they stand on, and his servant Lucky, whom he appears to control by means of a lengthy rope. Pozzo sits down to feast on chicken, and afterwards throws the bones to the two tramps. He entertains them by directing Lucky to perform a lively dance, and then deliver an ex tempore lecture on the theories of Bishop Berkeley. After Pozzo and Lucky depart, a boy arrives with a message supposedly from Godot, which states that Godot will not come today, but will come tomorrow evening. The boy also confesses that Godot beats his brother and that he and his brother sleep in the loft of a barn. The second act follows a similar pattern to the first, but when Pozzo and Lucky arrive, Pozzo has inexplicably gone blind and Lucky has gone mute. Again the boy arrives and announces that Godot will not appear. The much quoted ending of the play might be said to sum up the stasis of the whole work:
Passages from Waiting for Godot are available at
WikiquoteVladimir: Well, shall we go?
Estragon: Yes, let's go.
They do not move.



Resumos Relacionados


- Waiting For Godot

- En Attendant Godot - Waiting For Godot

- En Attendant Godot - Waiting For Godot

- Waiting For Godot

- En Attendant Godot - Waiting For Godot



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